Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Advocate For Mom

As my RSS feed filled with Breast is Best mantra's this month, I'm feeling compelled to put a bit of a different message out there today. So, go with me on this, please.

World Breastfeeding Week is held August 1-7, so naturally many of you fabulous mamas boasted something you've chosen for your family, something you believe is best, something you've worked hard to do as a mother: breastfeed.

But then there's the other side to the breastfeeding discussion: formula and the mamas who use it not just to supplement but around the clock. I was this mom, and if we have another babe I'll likely be that mom again. 

The formula feeding mom.

As much flack as breastfeeding moms may receive for feeding in public, formula feeding 
moms are catching just as much flack. I've become overly concerned by a vital pattern in this judging. You see, formula feeding moms are being judged not by outsiders of the mom community but by mothers themselves.

The breastfeeding community seems to be a tight-knit one and Lord knows to make it through that journey you likely need abundant support. However, shame as opposed to support is being given to those choosing to formula feed and often this shame is being brought on by other mothers.


This, my friends, is no small matter.




From the moment a nurse confirms your pregnancy something in you is changed as a woman; you're now a mother. And in that instant you begin to consult every book, every expert and even Dr. Google to ensure your child is given the best shot at this life.

Every mother is faced with the decision: breast v formula. Most of us throw caution to the wind and give it a go, others know from day one breastfeeding is not for them, and some have been waiting for the day they could nurse their child through breastfeeding. Every mom is different, every perspective is different and every mother's choice is her own to make. 

So why the internal mom-fight over breast and formula feeding?

If you're a breastfeeding 
mom, I applaud you. But today, I'm here to show outward support for those who choose to formula feed. 



There is no shame in choosing to formula feed. There is no reason or excuse you should have to give as to why you don't breastfeed. There is no person other than you, your partner and your pediatrician who can determine what is truly best for your child when it comes to feeding. There is no shame.

We're told of the ramifications of opting for formula as soon as that little line turns pink. From the most extreme accusations of formula ingredients, to sheer scolding of mothers for being lazy on the breastfeeding front, women who formula feed their children are at no less scrutiny than those who breastfeed. 

The day I sat on our couch in tears, some crazy contraption suctioned to my boob, and a screaming baby who didn't want to latch I had an epiphany: I am no good to him if I cannot hold my emotions together. I am no good to him if he cannot be properly fed. I am no good to him if I keep asserting all of my mental and physical efforts toward breastfeeding. 

In that moment, my husband handed me a bottle of Similac Sensitive and we never looked back. In my mind I thought I'd try again when my milk came in and my engorged self needed some soothing, but the milk never came. Not a single drop. No wonder my child wouldn't latch, there was nothing to be had. And truthfully, I half expected this as many women who've had breast reductions aren't able to breastfeed. I am one of those women; I am one of those moms.



The thing of it is, I went around that first year pleading this explanation to breastfeeding moms to ward off their judgment and side stares. But really? They did not need or deserve my explanation because I did what was best for me and my child just as every mother is expected to do.

Formula feeding moms, I'm here to tell you it's okay and your child still has a very bright future.

To my brother's embarrassment, I'm going to use him as my shining example of a formula fed child 23 years in the making. My mom formula fed my brothers, they're twins. Over the last 23 years each of them have pummeled through every stereotype a formula fed child has placed upon them. 



Above is Jackson with his Uncle T. He has had no failure to thrive. He has been the smartest in his class since elementary school. He has never known a GPA lower than 3.9. He has an insanely strong immune system. He has excelled in sports across the board. He has been chosen as "best looking" among his peers. He has grown into a healthy, thriving, academically intelligent young man entering his second year of med school. And to think, his mother formula fed him!

Moms of the world, formula feeding or not, this is your choice. Do not feel pressured by society into something that is not meant for you or your child. Find what is best for your family and run with it. I promise you'll be a better mother for it.

I want to close out this topic by quoting a Babble article from 2006 which debunked several formula-feeding stereotypes and brought this breast v formula debate to light in a productive manner:

How about this? Let’s agree that breastfeeding is ideal. Let’s agree that public policies and workplaces should support it better. But let’s also acknowledge that bottle-feeding moms need encouragement too. Cruelty helps no one – not babies, not moms. Imagine if we took half the energy we spend sniping at the formula crowd and turned it, instead, toward making it easier for women who breastfeed to keep their jobs, and for women who formula-feed to keep their dignity.

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53 comments:

  1. I would like to respectfully add my two cents. I think there's a big difference between a woman who can't breastfeed and chooses formula and a woman who doesn't want to breastfeed and chooses formula. Formula is better for babies. Period. There's mounds of research supporting that fact, and it's what nature intended for them to eat. Plus it's free, which is nice. Sadly, I think our culture has devolved into a very selfish society where people no longer really do what's hard or what they don't want to even if it's best for another person (and who could be more important to them than their own child?). If someone cannot breastfeed for some reason than obviously they should formula feed, but it seems a lot of women choose not to before they even try, and to me that's sad and concerning. What other things that are in the best interests of their child will they decide they don't want to do because it's inconvenient or difficult? I don't think formula fed moms should be shamed or admonished, but I do hope that greater education and understanding will let all moms and soon-to-be moms know that breastfeeding is the best option. Not only is is the ideal food for an infant but it does wonderful things for mama as well. It helps contract her uterus, decreases her risk of breast cancer, and provides bonding moments with her child. I hope I'm disagreeing in a respectful manner; my goal is not to offend or upset anyone, but I do tire of the moral and behavior relativism of today's society. Not every choice is equal. Some decisions are better, and in my opinion (backed by research and nature) breastfeeding is one of those better decisions.

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    1. Thank you for adding your two cents, and yes you did it respectfully (which I appreciate)! I agree breast feeding is ideal, natural (for some), and of course budget friendly. It also helps mom's body post-baby, or at least for some it does but it comes back to everyone's life perspective being very different. I've always been very self conscious about my breasts and in the months leading up to labor drove myself crazy over the anxieties of breast feeding. I knew it was best for him though so I attempted it. This is where we totally agree! It's important for everyone to be educated in breast feeding and formula feeding. And I agree it's important to at the very least try it, despite any lomgstanding fears. I faced so many personal anxieties in trying breast feeding as do many other moms. And like me many are unable to breastfeed for a variety of medical and personal reasons. I hope these women know they're supported in their decision. As for women who don't try breast feeding for one single moment, well, that's unfortunate, you're right. But they too need support in motherhood despite their feeding choices, and I hope you can agree with me there.

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    2. I also thought you were very respectful and I appreciate that so much, but I would like to point out something that I'm not sure you (or others that share your opinions) are aware of. There are massive discrepancies in what you just said, and this is why we (moms who used formula, regardless of the reason) often feel offended or judged. "I don't think formula fed moms should be shamed or admonished" -agreed! We shouldn't feel ashamed, but it's hard not to feel ashamed or judged when you also state that their choice was selfish, sad, and concerning. Basically, all you are saying is that women should feel free to make their choice, but if they don't choose breastfeeding then their choice is unfortunate. I am all for breastfeeding, or formula feeding... whichever it takes to create a happy and healthy environment for that child. What I am not for is judgment, and telling a mom that their choice (even if done in a round-a-bout way) is selfish, sad, or concerning is judgment all the way.

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    3. Anonymous you say "Formula is better for babies. Period." I think surely you meant breastfeeding?

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    4. Sarah, I believe Anonymous did mean to write in breastfeeding. At least that's how I went with it :)

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    5. Oops, yep, meant breastfeeding. Thanks. And you're right, It absolutely is a judgment. That was one of the points I was trying to make. Everyone has their opinions, and I think it's kind of silly to pretend like all choices are equal. They aren't. Some actually are better than others. Breastfeeding is a proven better choice so why should women who choose (for no physical/medical reason, simply choose) to make a less than best choice for their children get a big pat on the back? Also, when does this kind of relativism end? We could use the "whatever works for them" line to excuse every behavior under the sun. Don't get me wrong, I don't think women should be forced to breastfeed. I was horrified when Bloomberg tried to do so in NYC, but I also don't think I should have to pretend that someone who formula feeds for convenience or whatever reason is making as good of a decision as someone who breastfeeds. It's simply not the best decision, and it's disingenuous to pretend otherwise. In my opinion, women who choose to do something other than what's best for their children for no reason other than their own convenience are selfish, and that's very concerning to me.

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    6. Do you grow your own food on a plot of land that has never been chemically treated? Do you raise your own animals and produce/purchase soaps or detergents that have no chemicals in them? Do you walk everywhere always because driving pollutes the air your children inhale? Because those things are all the BEST choices for your kids in terms of health- science says so... but are they always realistic? Of course not. And would I be justified in telling you that your choices to either conform to what I've just said or not do (or should) concern me or others? Absolutely not. How would you feel to have a whole legion of people telling you that your choice to let your child eat a slice of pizza or genetically modified grocery store produce was selfish and concerning- that you were shorting your children because you made a choice that was not the absolute BEST for them? All of that sounds ridiculous to me, as does someone implying that I didn't make the best choices for my babies and my family because my choice is not their choice. When does the relativism end? Common sense. Because I'm human, I judge all the time, but I know when to keep those judgments to myself. I would never project my thoughts on how you raise your children on to you unless your children were in eminent danger or being abused. We are all mothers, we all very obviously want what's best for our children- the one things I know we agree on! :) But, what's best for one is not always best for another.

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    7. People tell us every day that these aren't the best decisions. Jamie Oliver's constantly admonishing parents for allowing their kids to drink flavored milk, parents with obese children are admonished for "allowing" them to be so, parents of children who appear to act out in public are constantly ridiculed (i.e. the Rainy Dayz cafe incident that just happened among many other examples); the list is endless. I guess the difference is that I don't expect people to pretend a bag of chips I feed my kids is as good as a fresh salad. I know it's not the best choice, they know it's not the best choice, the end. I also don't force my opinion on anyone; If I did I would've been doing cartwheels over Bloomberg's proposal to eliminate formula from hospitals. Instead, I was outraged. The only reason I'm sharing my thoughts here are because of this post. If someone said they formula feed I wouldn't launch into a breastfeeding diatribe. I wouldn't say anything at all. To each their own, but don't require me to pretend it's an equally good decision. It's ridiculous to pretend that all decisions are equal. Some really are better than others, and as far as infants are concerned breast milk truly is best for ALL of them. No exceptions. Just like vegetables and fruits are better for ALL people than fast food. No exceptions. Pretending fast food is just as good as a salad based on what the person eating them wants is nonsensical, but that's what you want when it comes to formula and breastfeeding.

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  2. I have 5 young children, and I used formula for every one of them. I breastfed here and there but never exclusively and never for longer than a month. My kids are healthy and perfect and have been awesome sleepers and NO ONE is going to convince me that breast milk would have changed a thing. With the last baby, the hospital was horrible and had I been a new mom I would have been in tears. Lucky for me, that is not the case, and I kindly told the nurse to drop her "Dangers of Formula Feeding" pamphlet in the trash and bring me some bottles :) To each his own! Thank you SO MUCH for writing this.

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    1. Thank you for this positive feedback. I'm glad to know there are other moms out there who can share in this point of view!

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  3. I'm glad you wrote this. I chose formula from the get go when Mackenzie was born. However, I stressed over my decision for the months leading up to her birth. What's worse is I wanted good, solid, useful, info for formula and unfortunately I couldn't find it. No one told me what to do, what amounts to feed her. Unfortunately she was in the NICU for a week and unfortunately I think that's the only reason I had any idea how much to give her at that age. I made my decision for many reasons but never shared them with friends or family, just my husband. What's sad is even though we had good reasons (and in the end, after Mackenzie was born, there were many more reasons that formula was best for us) I didn't, feel 'safe' to really talk about it. Because of the judgement you talk about. I wish we could all just be supportive of every mom! It's so hard, especially in the beginning, especially with your first baby, that we shouldn't have to feel ashamed of taking care of our children.

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  4. Thanks for encouraging mamas who are facing the tough decision of breast v. formula feeding. I, too, was unable to breastfeed. Not because I couldn't make the milk, but because after a week and a half my daughter was screaming ALL.THE.TIME! We went to the pediatrician and he told me I could start cutting things out of my diet (I was hardly eating anything, so pinpointing the cause would have been nearly impossible) or I could move to formula. He assured me it was okay...that all three of his kids were formula-fed. And you know what, it has been okay! My child at 9 months is head and shoulders above the kids her age in her daycare class. So what if she was fed formula? It's what she needed, what her little tummy could tolerate, and I don't regret giving up on breastfeeding.

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  5. I applaud you for writing this! And I agree with you. It is every single woman's choice. No one should be criticizing anyone's decision because it is really none of their business.
    I have 3 kids, you know that. I have 2 strictly formula fed and one who was both. And I will not go into my story for each child, I did what was best. No way am I more bonded with the breast milk baby than I was with either strictly formula fed baby. I am their mom, made each decision appropriately for us and I would never look down on another mom for any of their decisions on how to feed. What to feed. Where to feed. Or diaper, for that matter.

    The comment above about "What other things that are in the best interests of their child will they decide they don't want to do because it's inconvenient or difficult?" That is judgmental. Judgements should be kept to yourself. That is what I was taught as a child and teach my own children.

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    1. Personally, I think that's part of the problem in the world today. People should be able to have strong, divergent opinions in a respectful way and talk about them with others without being labeled judgmental (which is a judgment itself, isn't it?). Having a different opinion is not wrong. I'm not saying everyone should do things my way. I'm simply saying let's not pretend they're both equally good choices for infants because they aren't. This may shock everyone, but my second child was partially formula fed up until 8 months and had formula and solids afterwards. The difference, I guess, is that I didn't go around pretending that formula was just as good as breast milk. I knew breast milk would've been a better choice, but for him that didn't work out (coincidentally he is also my only child with asthma and lots of allergies. Could they be connected? I don't know.) I just don't understand why we must we force others to think/believe that formula is just as good as breast milk when that's not true.

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    2. I'm with you on allowing everyone's differing opinions. That's how the world goes round, right? In reference to the last bit of my post, I want to point out that I agree breastfeeding is ideal and that fact is not up for debate (at least by me). I don't think these ladies are trying to force anyone to believe formula is equally as nutritious as breastmilk for infants, just that they themselves have seen their children grow into healthy beings despite being formula fed. I think these mothers just want to walk in the same confidence knowing they're making the best choice for their children even if that means their child(ren) aren't breastfed. We can still raise healthy, thriving children whether breastfed or formula-fed, and each mom deserves support in their personal journey with their children. I whole-heartedly believe that's what they're trying to say here, not that one holds more nutritional value than the other.

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    3. You can have an opinion. You can express your opinion, just without making judgement on others. Calling a mom out to be lazy because they made a different choice is the definition of judgmental. Had you not said that in your response then it would not have been judgmental. It would have been your opinion on the view and that is all.
      I did not make a judgement and say anything about you or your choice, be it positive or negative. That is the way that a constructive argument is supposed to go.

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    4. Tracy, I fear you read into my posts and attributed things to me that I never said. I never used the word lazy. I just did a quick "search and find" and "lazy" appeared only in the original post by Erin and your comments, never in mine.

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    5. Furthermore, the statement you initially quoted was a question. If we can't ask questions in an attempt to have a conversation we'll never get anywhere. This is yet another problem in our society; the second someone doesn't like what someone else is saying the "offending speaker" is automatically racist, sexist, judgmental, etc. Heaven forbid they just have a differing opinion. Throwing out these labels only halt what may otherwise be a productive conversation.

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    6. @Tracy- Mothers who chose to use formula weren't called lazy, they were called selfish. Get it right! ;)

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    7. I am curious to know what you would call doing something that one knows is not in the best interest of their child simply because it's easier for them? To me, that seems selfish.
      Also, in regards to this statement, "All of that sounds ridiculous to me, as does someone implying that I didn't make the best choices for my babies and my family because my choice is not their choice." This has nothing to do with "my choice." It has to do with scientific data, research, and indisputable facts. If you want to make it a personal thing, go ahead, but that doesn't really change anything. Formula is not as good as breast milk.
      My intention in commenting (which I totally regret at this point) was not to push buttons or get people riled up (which some will probably find hard to believe), it was simply to say that more education may help those who don't want to breastfeed give it a shot because there are advantages for mom and baby.
      Ultimately, motherhood is hard enough without feeling like every decision you're making is wrong in some way. I get that, which is why I do think moms should be supported whatever their choice. I just don't think it's fair to demand others pretend all decisions are equal when data says otherwise.

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    8. Lazy, selfish, or any other word that is belittling etc is judgmental. Plain and simple. I am not arguing or reading into anything that you said. I am reading the information and giving a fact that you are judging them. Saying they are "selfish" is a judgement.

      A Mom who has her own allergies etc and cannot consume certain foods or on certain medications would need to consider that when deciding to breast feed. That situation may not be the "best" milk for the baby to consume. It could cause health problems. It may not. Therefor they are not being selfish but making a choice to use formula because is it the BEST for their child. Or the mom is thinking it is the best. Also, most families consist of more than just a child and a mother. There are other factors that some moms have to consider when making choices that are best for their baby and family. Things are never black and white. You are saying that breast milk is always better than formula, I just gave you 2 examples of how it is not always best. Do not judge a mom for their decision because many factors have gone into that decision and it is theirs alone.

      @Sarah - LOL oops. Selfish, yes. That. ;)

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    9. Tracy, I highly recommend some reading comprehension classes. I was talking strictly about those who choose to breastfeed for no other reason than they just don't want to breastfeed. I supplemented my child's diet with formula for medical reasons; I totally get that, but that's NOT what I have been talking about. It's impossible to converse with you because all you want to do is attack me for my views (oh the hypocrisy!) and not deal with the issue I'm addressing: formula feeding for convenience despite being able to nurse. And fyi breastmilk is ALWAYS best. Ever heard of wet nurses and donating breast milk? It doesn't always have to come directly from the biological mother. Breast milk is always more nutritious than formula, but since you're unwilling to even admit that there's no point in speaking with you. I'd have better luck turning to a brick wall for stimulating and productive conversation. I've tried to remain polite and on topic, but your tendency to simply name call and NOT READ what I'm writing makes you impossible to talk too. Also, you may want to consult a dictionary because "lazy" and "selfish" aren't interchangeable so when you said that I said "lazy" you were reading into things and not reading correctly.

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    10. I have 2 friends in mind when I read the statement that breast milk is ALWAYS best. The first, through huge trial and error, discovered that her baby was allergic to her breast milk. The second was unable to produce enough calories to sustain a baby. The quantity of liquid was there, the calories were not. Obviously, these were not common cases. But a better statment to make would be breast milk is USUALLY best. I had my 5th baby when my oldest was 4yrs old. To nurse a baby around the clock was an impossibility for me personally if I was to be a good mother to the other 4. My choice, knowing that there might be something of higher nutritional value, was not selfish because it was made with my 4 other children in mind, not myself. We all make choices every day for our kids that might not be the 100% best choice available, but we each do the best that we can with what we have. No one is arguing the value of breastfeeding, only that it is never right to openly judge someone for making a choice that was the best choice for them when it differs from your own. I think our debate has illustrated the exact issue that we formula using mothers encounter. People accept what we do, but view it as an unfortunate alternative to what we SHOULD have done and then try and provide us with more education in an effort to guide us to the better option.

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    11. I'm sure the fact that it was also easier for you had nothing to do with it, right? Tell me again, why were 1,2,3, and 4 formula fed too? That's rhetorical because I honestly don't care what people do. I really don't. I just wish people could own the fact that sometimes they're doing things aren't as good as another choice they could've made and not force everyone else to happily encourage them in those choices. Why do you guys care so much what others think? WHO cares? Be confident and happy in the decisions you're making for your family and stop asking everyone else to praise you for it. That's all I want. Why do we need a pat on the back for every choice we make? It's the whole, "Praise me for my choice" mentality that I revolt against. As I addressed earlier, we all probably make less than ideal choices on a daily (if not hourly) basis. Summer's winding down, and I'm sure there are families indulging in more tv and junk food than is ideal simply because they're exhausted (I'll be the first to admit that's totally going on in this house). However, I'm not going around demanding others say, "You should support me and say that my decision to let my kids watch this much tv and eat chips is great and the best for my family, just as good as vegetables and playing outside." That's ridiculous, but that's what's going on here. Stop seeking approval and just do what you think is right. Maybe comments from others (whether unsolicited or in response to a post online) won't bother you so much.

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    12. I completely agree with you @Sarah. And @Anonymous I am not being anything but polite. So I think that it is you that needs to re-look at the comments. I have not once argued with you about breastfeeding, I have not called you any names (unsure where you see that at), I am simply saying being judgmental or saying that breast is ALWAYS best is not correct, in my opinion. Breast milk is USUALLY best. I gave you examples and so did Sarah on the situations that we have encountered where the moms milk was not best for their baby. I personally would never use another mothers milk and yes I have heard of those programs. To me, it is a greater risk of my child being exposed to a disease with using those programs than using formula. To me, that is not best for my child. And if another mom wants to use it, more power to them. I would not judge them for it. It is THEIR CHOICE. And that is MY opinion and no one needs to agree with me on that. FYI my Grandmother was only alive because of a wet nurse because her mother passed away during her delivery. I am thankful for that nurse.
      I also said that I did not mean lazy, I meant selfish. I thought you said lazy and corrected myself.
      You are the one bashing me and telling me to take a reading comprehension class. When in fact, I have multiple degrees and concentrations...I have put 10 years into extended schooling. I do not need any more, thanks. Saying that is offensive and judgmental, making my original statement all the more true. (which is the only thing I said was that you are being judgmental, that is not bashing, that is a true statement as there are facts behind it, see your above comments)
      I am confident in my decisions for my own family. I also really don't care what people think about my choices, they are mine to make. I have never once said that I cared about anyone's opinion on this subject or any other. Nor have I tried to make anyone think that my choice is the best choice for everyone else. And I have never asked for praise from anyone for my choices for my family. As long as my husband and I agree on things, that is all that matters.
      For me, commenting on this post was just to show Erin support. And to help show the world what a formula feeding mom has to deal with on a daily basis. We are judged. It is not easy being a mom and feeling the bashing from others just makes it even harder.

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  6. I had a big long comment that got deleted. Long story short: WHO and all the other medical associations state breastfeeding is THE best choice nutritionally. BUT that isn't always the best choice for the mother/baby for a lot of other reasons.

    We need to support each other no matter what the choice is and we shouldn't feel the need to defend it, yet we all seem to. I tend to agree with "Anonymous" and think that better breastfeeding education needs to be a worldwide initiative. 800 000 babies die annually in 3rd world countries due to lack of breastfeeding knowledge. In our developed countries, we're blessed to even have the choice.

    But I am admittedly one of those moms who "boasts" about her breastfeeding successes. I exclusively breastfed Ethan for the first 6 months of his life as WHO recommends. I am one of <15% of Canadian women who do so. It is what it is and I'm proud of it, but I also don't think this makes me a better mom than you or anyone else.

    I have nothing but respect and admiration for you :)

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    1. Sarah, I'm glad you took the time to read and comment. I was hoping you'd chime in! You are one of the strongest advocates of breastfeeding I've come across, yet you can still lend a supportive ear to those who live life differently. Thank you for being supportive of mothers with a different story than yours. It's so appreciated!

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  7. Thank you for this post!

    I never knew a single soul who formula fed. Ever. My mom had my sister when I was 11 and nursed for well over a year, close to two, as she did with me. My aunts, cousins, family friends -- everyone breastfed. When I was pregnant, I never even gave a thought to formula, or that it was an option. For me, it wasn't. I dreamed of nursing my child and had a closet stocked up of nursing bras and creams and supplies. No one ever asked me about formula. No one ever asked how I planned on feeding. After all, it never crossed my mind -- I thought formula was only used by lazy people on "Teen Mom."

    And then I had my kid, and preeclampsia, and they couldn't get my pressure down, and I was unconscious for the first 2 days of his life. I didn't get to hold him until he was 2 days old. I was on anti-seizure meds that I couldn't breastfeed on and that my doctor warned me might cause milk to never come in. Still, I was attached to the pump around the clock. Nothing ever came in. At three days post partum, my breasts started shrinking back to their pre-pregnancy size and that was it. My husband went out to get a case of formula one night and I literally sat in bed wanting to honest to god die. For the first few months of my son's life all I remember is depression. I remember not deserving to be a mother. Not deserving to even LIVE. My husband was Mr. Mom those first few months until I realized...I'm a good mom. My son needs me. It doesn't MATTER that he's formula fed.

    Fast forward and I have a 2 year old who not only meets his milestones, but exceeds them. He can speak in 6 word sentences. He eats everything under the sun -- a plate of brussel sprouts? No problem. As I became a mom and met other mom friends, I met moms who have the judgement on formula feeding moms, but I met a lot of moms who make the CHOICE to formula feed. And you know what? They're not lazy. They're awesome moms doing what works for them!

    I don't know what will happen if I have another child, but I know that my child will survive either way, even if on formula. ;)

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    1. It's wild how our expectations for motherhood often end so far from what we'd mentally prepared for, and yet still amazing. Lindsay, you are such a good mama to Ethan! Thank you for sharing your forumla experience!

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  8. I should also point out I feel there is a huge difference in being proud of and boasting about breastfeeding success (and I'd love to congratulate you on your goals, that's awesome!) AND putting down other kids. I.E. that "breastfed toddler" meme? That's just crappy. Why put down other kids to build yourself up, you know? I don't think that's advocacy or pride in breastfeeding...I think that's being mean and petty, and unnecessary. My 2 year old is on his 21st haircut -- literally -- I think his hair is growing in just fiiiiiiiine. :)

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  9. I'm so glad you wrote this. I had a lot of unnecessary mom guilt over choosing to formula feed Colin, and now that I've had the opportunity to experience a great breastfeeding relationship, I see the pros and cons of both sides. I will admit, as wonderful as breastfeeding is, it's been a challenge, especially as a working mom. Some days I feel so ready to just throw in the towel and not be tied to the pump.

    You're such a great mom to Jackson, Erin. An inspiration to the rest of us mommas.

    Oh, and your brother is a babe! LOL!

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  10. Thank you for sharing Erin! I was discussing with J last week about everything you shared. Thank you for being a supportive mom to those who breastfeed and those who don't!

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    شركة تنظيف موكيت بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف كنب بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف مجالس بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف ستائر بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف مفروشات بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف بساط بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف انتريهات بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف صالونات بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف مساجد بالمدينه المنوره

    5- شركات جلى الرخام

     

    شركة جلى رخام بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى بلاط بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تلميع سيراميك بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة تنظيف سيراميك بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى سيراميك بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى ارضيات بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى مطابخ بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى حمامات بالمدينه المنوره

    شركة جلى اسطح بالمدينه المنورهمكه
    زهرة مكه

    شركة نقل عفش بمكه

    شركة نقل اثاث بمكه
    شركة مكافحة العته بجده

    شركة مكافحة الصراصير بجده

    شركة مكافحة النمل الابيض بجده

    شركة مكافحة البق بجده

    شركة مكافحة الفئران بجده
    شركة تنسيق حدائق بجده

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